The Key Features Behind A Successful Marketing Campaign


There are many successful and popular campaigns out there, but what exactly makes a good campaign?


Tocquigny Staff 's insight:

What makes a good campaign? No two brands are exactly alike, and while you could come up with a great idea, it needs to fit around the image and tone of the brand. Also, you have to take into consideration that social media campaigns are not a one-way street, there needs to be something that will catch the eye of your followers to ensure it’s shared.


While there are many examples of successful marketing campaigns out there, there are a number of key features that turn them into a great campaign.


Here are seven factors and accompanying case studies that made these campaigns memorable.


See on simplyzesty.com

Tocquigny Staff posted by Tocquigny Staff

View comments

BACK TO THE TOP

5 Digital Milestones You May Be Too Young To Remember


The internet is advancing at a breakneck speed and most people have a recollection of some of the most important milestones of the last decade: 2003 - Launch

Tocquigny Staff 's insight:

The internet is advancing at a breakneck speed and most people have a recollection of some of the most important milestones of the last decade:


2003 – Launch of My Space, LinkedIn, WordPress


2004 – Launch of Facebook, Flickr, Digg and Tagged


But how did we get where we are now? Who were the pioneers and when did advertising on the internet, search engines and mobile marketing all begin?


If you want to have an interesting conversation over lunch or dinner, ask whoever you’re eating with if they know in which year these “digital firsts” started out.



See on business2community.com

Tocquigny Staff posted by Tocquigny Staff

View comments

BACK TO THE TOP

Content Strategy Trends to Watch in 2013: Adaptive Web Design



Tocquigny Staff 's insight:

Chances are you know content strategists have something to do with making matrixes. Sadly, we don’t strut in long leather coats or don slick aviator-style glasses (while at work) like Keanu and his band of friends inThe Matrix (leather is in, but that’s so 2003). But like the characters in The Matrix, content strategists are often misunderstood, their purpose shrouded in mystery.


Just what are content strategists doing with those Content Audits and Content Gaps? If you didn’t know better, you’d worry that these words describe accounting software. Nothing could be further from the truth.


Audits, analyses and gaps – these words mask the true nature of content strategy. Which is? To create dazzlingly persuasive user experiences – experiences that accomplish a user’s or a brand’s mission: to research a purchase, foster connectedness and ultimately engage in a transaction.


Content Strategy plans for and supports the über experience: discover, engage, transact, applaud and measure.  What do I mean? Just think about yourself. Let’s say you’re seeking to engage in cool content X (cool is relevant, it’s what you make it). You find and engage in said content, the content spurs you to transact  (a transaction could be a purchase or, in a social environment, the desire to interact), and based on the experience, you’re so happy with that experience that you tell others about it in some manner (blogging, word of mouth, reviews, tweeting it, pinning it, commenting, etc.). And when all is said and done, we substantiate – with metrics – that our strategies were, yes, thatpersuasive.


Yesterday’s content strategists had it a lot easier. There were a few basic content types in the collective online vocabulary: text in various flavors (product descriptions, FAQs, about us descriptions, news, etc.), audio, a little video and a few webinars – and fewer metrics.


Today the available content vocabulary has become infinitely more complex – with infographics, slideshows, social media content, communities content, UGC, social data, data visualizations and more…and – thanks to device diversification and adaptive web design – at least four distinctly different screen sizes (mobile, tablet, desktop and TV) on which we can deliver these persuasive and engaging experiences.

With 2012 in the rearview mirror, 2013 will see engaging trends rising everywhere. The core andemergent trends to have on the radar include:

  • Adaptive Web Design
  • Video: One Size Does Not Fit All
  • Social Design: Increasing Content Consumption



In the weeks to come we’ll talk about the good, the bad and the new trends.


For now, let’s get started and talk about the adaptive movement.



See on blogs.imediaconnection.com

Tocquigny Staff posted by Tocquigny Staff

View comments

BACK TO THE TOP

The Top 10 Most Remarkable Marketing Campaigns EVER [Slideshow]


SlideShare presentation of our list of the top 10 most remarkable marketing campaigns ever — and why they deserve a look.

Tocquigny Staff 's insight:

re·mark·able


worthy of being or likely to be noticed, especially as being uncommon or extraordinary


When Seth Godin wrote his book, Purple Cow: Transform Your Business By Being Remarkable, he forced a lot of marketers to face the fact that we’d slowly but surely been digging our own graves via boring, traditional “mass marketing” — and that the only way out was to stop being part of the herd, and “be remarkable.”


There are a lot of advantages to being remarkable. Decreased sales and marketing spend, for one. Unfair competitive advantage, for another. And quite possibly, category domination and greater customer lifetime value.

But getting there isn’t easy. In fact, most marketers don’t have a clue where to begin.


So here’s an idea: Start by learning from THE BEST.


We’ve compiled our very own list of “The Top 10 Most Remarkable Marketing Campaigns EVER,” and included here a few juicy details explaining what made each campaign so remarkable, and what strategies you should literally STEAL, er … borrow, as inpiration for your next marketing initiative.



See on blog.hubspot.com

Tocquigny Staff posted by Tocquigny Staff

View comments

BACK TO THE TOP

How to Design Your Business Card With Psychology in Mind [Infographic]


When creating a business card, keep in mind that it will be a memento in someone’s wallet or purse to remind them of your meeting. So make sure your card includes these top 5 elements of the well-designed business card.


Tocquigny Staff 's insight:

Don’t think too much about your business card? Then neither will your potential clients.


When creating a business card, keep in mind that it will be a memento in someone’s wallet or purse to remind them of your meeting. If the card is sloppily put together, folks will remember you like that. However, if the card is clean, bright, and smart-looking, they’ll probably remember you like that, too.


The [above] infographic by Online Business Cards from uPrinting highlights the top 5 elements of a well-designed business card.


1. Typography. Serif or sans-serif? Serifs are the small lines on the edges of a letter; sans-serifs are fonts without the serifs.


2. Spacing. Don’tcramallthewordstogether. As you can see, that was annoying to read. Don’t do the same thing on your business card. Give your text space.


3. Font choice. Elegant, fanciful, straightforward, or handwritten? Your choice of typeface should convey the culture and spirit of your business.

4. White space. Make sure your business card isn’t too busy with colors, text, and graphic. A too-busy business card confuses people, and they won’t know where to look.


5. Color. The color you choose should convey the right emotional message. For example, red might convey love, energy, and danger.



See on marketingprofs.com

Tocquigny Staff posted by Tocquigny Staff

View comments

BACK TO THE TOP

Revealed! How creative agencies get their names


Where do creatives agencies’ names come from? This enlightening infographic from Cargo Collective explains all…

Tocquigny Staff 's insight:

Where do creative agencies get their names from? Rob and Joe of Cargo Collective decided to analyse the names of some well-known agencies and work backwards, to create this impressively complex Taxonomy of Advertising Agency Names.


As the chart illustrates, agencies draw their naming inspiration from a range of sources, from the names of the founders to countries and planets, all way through to abstract concepts and biblical references.


Does your agency’s name fit into Rob and Joe’s taxonomy, or do they need to add more categories? Take a closer look at the infographic above (click here to see the high-res version) and find out!


See on creativebloq.com

Tocquigny Staff posted by Tocquigny Staff

View comments

BACK TO THE TOP

17 digital marketing and ecommerce trends for 2013 by Econsultancy CEO Ashley Friedlein



Tocquigny Staff 's insight:

Following are my personal thoughts on what will be interesting and important in the world of digital marketing and ecommerce for 2013. As is traditional for my trends, there are around seventeen of them.


I haven’t spent too much time on giving extensive justification for any of these; they are based largely on the many conversations I have with industry influencers and practitioners.


Many are really just notes, or bullet points, but I’ve tried to give links to further information if you want to delve deeper. They are in no particular order though I’ve started with the more ‘strategic’ stuff.


17 digital marketing and ecommerce trends for 2013


See on econsultancy.com

Tocquigny Staff posted by Tocquigny Staff

View comments

BACK TO THE TOP

The top 6 digital marketing trends for 2013


To stay competitive, digital marketers must filter the core trends from the useless noise. Consider these major developments to stay ahead of the curve


Tocquigny Staff 's insight:

Digital marketing is changing at a rapid pace. We marketers face a parade of shiny new technologies, tools, and platforms that promise to change everything.


With so much fluctuation, it’s important to filter the core trends from the noise to understand what will shape the digital marketing landscape this year.


Here are six trends in digital marketing to embrace now and stay ahead of the curve in 2013.

Digital marketing agencies will double in quantity

Online marketing has long “crossed the chasm” and now is taking over the full mass market with the late majority and laggers. A known characteristic of laggers is that they like their products bundled, tested, and at an affordable price. These factors contribute to the increase in digital marketing agencies — from owner-operated agencies and consultants all the way to creative agencies offering the full span of sophisticated online services. The digital marketing agency is only going to grow.

Marketers become data geeks

The growth of digital data will be 44 times greater in 2020 than it was in 2009. That volume of data production is pretty overwhelming for marketers who aren’t smart about how they use that knowledge. Marketers and agencies will need to analyze, interpret, and translate this data into meaningful insight and actions. Attributing revenue to the correct marketing source will be increasingly important. More B2B companies will adopt multi-channel reporting to judge the effectiveness of their channel mix and determine each channel’s incremental contributions. In addition, these analytics will be used to refine segmentation and targeting.

Agencies dive deeper into technology

Code is the universal language of the internet. It’s the foundation of all things digital. Agencies and marketers will be expected to understand “the back-end” of everything as the level of complexity to deliver on brand engagement and revenue growth across multiple channels increases. Knowing what an API is and how to build an interface to create simple and actionable reports will become a marketing requirement. For the same reason, 2013 will see a significant rise in the number of collaborations between agency and marketing technologies.

More responsive websites

User experience is becoming a major part of every website, and personalization is at its core. Personalization will grow, and services that offer the ability to personalize experience will emerge as well — whether it is cookie-based, login-based, or self-select preferences.

Rise of content creation services and software

Content marketing is becoming the core of every marketing initiative for B2B marketing as well as B2C. As the year progresses, we will see software and services solutions for content creation and syndication emerge and grow as companies try to leverage content for demand generation.

Stronger connection between offline and online events

Nowadays, there is a lot of discussion about the connection between the digital world and the physical world. Cross-channel campaigns will include offline events such as direct mail, tradeshows, city tours, and networking events. Companies need to tie offline events to online engagement to measure the impact of these cross-channel campaigns. Being relevant to your customer in every context improves your brand’s awareness, and engagement will ultimately lead to more customers. This will require marketers to remove the silos in their go-to-market strategy and focus on the most important thing — their customers. Customers no longer have simply offline or simply online experiences; they have integrated brand experiences.


See on imediaconnection.com

Tocquigny Staff posted by Tocquigny Staff

View comments

BACK TO THE TOP

How Marketing Will Change In 2013: The Strategic Forecast


Part two of a two-part series: Brand strategists weigh in on the social, cultural, and media factors that will change marketing this year and beyond.


Tocquigny Staff 's insight:

In Part One of our 2013 marketing forecast, we asked a number of high-level creative types for their educated predictions on how their jobs and the marketing landscape would change in 2013.


Now, we’re passing the mic to the strategists. These are the people who are said to represent the consumer in the marketing process—they’re the masters of research, the experts in media and culture that are responsible for generating brand insights and opportunities. As they’re steeped in knowledge of consumer behavior, we wanted to add their big-picture perspective to our look at what the near future of advertising may hold.


We asked them what were the big shifts in consumer and media trends that would impact marketing and the wider cultural trends feeding these changes. They’ve got a lot on their minds, apparently, so settle in for a long and enlightening read.


Continue Reading …


See on fastcocreate.com

Tocquigny Staff posted by Tocquigny Staff

View comments

BACK TO THE TOP

Twitter Survival Guide & 15 Must Do Tips for the CEO, CMO, CTO, CIO



Tocquigny Staff 's insight:

So you have finally said “yes.” It feels almost like as big of a commitment as the day that special someone said “I do!”.


You honestly never thought this day would come. You thought that crazy lil’ blue bird was a fad. Something that would fly away and you could move on with your day job.


Nope, that lil’ blue bird is still live and kickin’! Crazy thing is you are starting to see the power of the blue bird and it’s friends. You are seeing people you never thought would jump on Twitter, love it. You are seeing other CEOs, CMOs and even your best friend nurturing relationships. Some of them even have Hootsuite on their iPhone. Worst part is they know how to use it, and you don’t!


No worries. We got you covered! Here are the top 15 things you must do before you hop on Twitter.

15 Things Every CEO, CMO, CTO & CIO Must Do Before Hopping on Twitter

See on business2community.com

Tocquigny Staff posted by Tocquigny Staff

View comments

BACK TO THE TOP

B2People: Humanly Relevant Marketing for the New Year



Tocquigny Staff 's insight:

The lines have blurred throughout the historically “distinct” macro-target markets. Traditionally, marketing is broken down into three key areas, B2C, B2B and B2G. Each one has essentially marketed to different groups: the first, clearly, to another business, wholesaler or retailer; the second to consumers directly; and the last to government entities.


However, this approach is problematic, especially when targeting the B2B and B2G audiences. Yes, there is certain language that resonates within each group. For example, a manufacturer needs to use language that is directly applicable to a wholesaler. And a defense contractor ought to know the correct language to approach the Pentagon. But, as marketing professionals, we must go beyond the basics. It appears that a fundamental component is lost.


We have forgotten that regardless of the target market, the key decision-maker, whether he or she is a financial adviser, a hospital administrator, a CEO, a mom buying a toy for her child, or the head of a large contractor for the military, is first and foremost a human. Such decision-makers have fears and joys; trials and tribulations; and moments that bring them happiness. This is true both professionally and personally. Ultimately, that means our approach to communications needs to evolve.


We should no longer look at communications purely from a B2B, B2C or B2G angle. It is now B2People.



Continue Reading … 


See on forbes.com

Tocquigny Staff posted by Tocquigny Staff

View comments

BACK TO THE TOP

5 Marketing Predictions for 2013


We contacted several advertising experts and reviewed recent studies and business trends to come up with 5 marketing predictions for 2013.

Tocquigny Staff 's insight:

There was certainly no shortage of big developments in the marketing world throughout 2012. Facebook created a massive mobile advertising business in less than year, Red Bull literally financed a trip into the stratosphere to create powerful branded content, and a YouTube video finally hit 1 billion views, showing the potential reach for online videos.


So what might 2013 bring for marketers?


We contacted several advertising experts and reviewed recent studies and business trends to come up with five marketing predictions for the coming year.


Advertisers Pursue Mobile-First Strategy


Mobile advertising exploded in 2012, with eMarketer projecting in December that U.S. mobile ad spend would nearly triple to $4 billion for the year. Much of this growth is due to Facebook and Google, both experiencing huge growth in revenue from their mobile ad products in 2012. Facebook, in particular, announced its first mobile ad product — Sponsored Stories in mobile News Feeds — in February, and now generates more than $3 million per day from mobile ads.



As these platforms continue to improve their ad formats for marketers this year — and consumers continue to spend more time and money on mobile devices — advertising spend on mobile will only continue to skyrocket. In fact, eMarketer expects mobile ads to increasingly become the top priority for advertisers on digital, rather than desktop.



"For many years, you had marketers emphasizing a build-for-the-desktop-first approach, and similarly you had a lot of advertising publishers and platforms that developed their products for the desktop," said Clark Fredricksen, VP of communications for eMarketer. "Now we are seeing more people build for mobile first with the desktop as the second priority."


Brands and Publishers Re-Think Banner Ads


Banner ads are easy to hate: they have lousy click-through rates and typically don’t translate well from desktop to mobile. Several people we spoke with in the advertising industry predicted that marketers will be devoting less and less of their budgets on these display ads, but even they admit that the banner ad isn’t going away for good anytime soon. In the interim, some brands and publishers are trying to come up with new and creative ways to innovate on banner ads, rather than just write them off.



On Friday, ESPN.com debuted an interactive banner ad (seen above) that prompts visitors to vote on which of two teams will win an upcoming college football game. The ESPN ad then changes color depending on which team is leading in the polls. ESPN isn’t the first to tweak the traditional banner ad. IKEA launched a clever promotion in April that squeezed all 2,800 of the store’s products into a tiny 300X250 pixel banner ad and let users scroll over and zoom in on different items. More recently, Gucci experimented with banner ads that could be pinned directly to Pinterest.



This isn’t likely to stop the overall shift away from banner ads, but these efforts show there is still room for innovation. Or, as IAB president and CEO Randall Rothenberg put it in an interview with Mashable, “People look at shitty banner ads and think the problem is the banner ads. The problem is shitty advertising.”


Native Advertising Starts to Replace Traditional Display Ads


Native advertising has turned into an amorphous buzz word that means different things to different people, but at the most basic level, this phrase simply refers to ads that are delivered in-stream and integrated as seamlessly as possible into the core user experience. These ads took off in 2012 and will increasingly become the preferred form of display advertising in the coming year.



"If 2012 proved anything in mobile, it proved that the ad publishers using so-called native formats are able to deliver much more effectively with mobile devices and in essence are able to overcome the historical disadvantages of display advertising on a small screen," Fredricksen said. "We are seeing a dramatic upswing and we expect that to continue."


Facebook and Twitter applied this formula with great success in 2012 by inserting sponsored posts into their respective streams on mobile devices.


Many publishers, including Mashable, have expanded their own native advertising options for mobile and the web by letting advertisers create ad units that appear in the stream of content published on the website. In fact, a recent survey found that a third of publishers are “likely or very likely” to add a native advertising option to their websites.


Looking Beyond The Total Number of Likes


Having more fans or followers on social networks doesn’t necessarily mean having greater engagement; in fact some recent studies suggest that the opposite is often the case.



Napkin Labs, a Facebook app developer, analyzed the pages for 50 brands with between 200,000-1 million likes each, and found that just 6% of fans engaged with their Facebook Pages on average. What’s more, those pages with at least 900,000 fans actually had 60% less engagement than those pages with 500,000-600,000 fans. Likewise, Sling Digital, a Twitter ad optimization service, analyzed accounts for all Fortune 100 companies active on the social network, and found that engagement tended to drop off for brands with more followers.



That doesn’t mean brands can’t and shouldn’t aspire to accumulating a strong following, but it does mean more brands will have to re-focus their emphasis on engagement metrics beyond the number of likes and followers.



"Every business has to measure what they do and make sure that it is effective," Riley Gibson, the co-founder and CEO of Napkin Labs, told Mashable in a previous interview. “Likes can be part of that measurement, but we need to start looking beyond that a bit, and start looking in more depth at what fans are actually doing.”



Relying More on Big Data As A Marketing Tool


One of the biggest lessons for marketers from the presidential election in November is just how powerful a tool big data can be.



Several companies have launched in recent years to offer tools to help provide data analysis to brands and marketers, including BloomReach which provides brands with big data to help with SEO and Swipe.ly which helps retailers analyze their sales and social data to understand trends with their business. These and other tools will change the way companies think about marketing and running their business.



"Big data is really emerging as a key currency in marketing," Fredricksen said. "Increasingly, we are seeing more companies use big data and analytics to drive customer insights, create their budgets and to manage operations, the supply chain, customer support, product strategy and pricing."


See on mashable.com

Tocquigny Staff posted by Tocquigny Staff

View comments

BACK TO THE TOP

The Only 2013 Marketing Guide You Need to Succeed



Tocquigny Staff 's insight:

Want your 2013 marketing to succeed? Of course you do! (Who doesn’t?) Then follow this 2013 Marketing Guide written in plain English and broken into 105 easy-to-follow steps.

To get your 2013 marketing on track regardless of whether you work for a B2C, B2B, not-for-profit or you’re a solopreneur, this 105 point checklist is a must-have business tool. It’s useful for specialized marketers including social media, content marketing and mobile.



105 Point Checklist to Get 2013 Marketing On Track

See on heidicohen.com

Tocquigny Staff posted by Tocquigny Staff

View comments

BACK TO THE TOP

4 tips for doing B2B social media for an international audience


Doing business in other countries means working with a different community, here are 4 tips for B2B social media when working abroad.

Tocquigny Staff 's insight:

It’s hard to find a major company these days that isn’t doing business with overseas customers and partners — or planning to. A recent PricewaterhouseCoopers business survey reports that roughly half of the private companies in the U.S. have established a global presence.


Doing business in another country means working with distributors, partners, and consultants — a whole business community. Yet for many companies, B2B social media programs are being designed and implemented from corporate headquarters — usually by people who have never set foot in the countries where many of their customers are.


Not surprisingly, many social media tactics that work “back home” are ineffective in another country.


Here are 4 tips for avoiding common mistakes and making your B2B social media marketing an international success.


See on socialbusinessmaven.com

Tocquigny Staff posted by Tocquigny Staff

View comments

BACK TO THE TOP

The Wonderful World of Difficult Clients [Infographic]


Most companies must deal with clients. Unfortunately, some clients can be extremely difficult. To help you identify and handle challenging clients, Ciplex created an infographic highlighting the most common difficult client types.


Tocquigny Staff 's insight:

Most companies must deal with clients, but not all clients are rays of sunshine. The wonderful world of clients includes those who are demanding and just plain confusing.


To help you identify the signs of a potentially difficult client, Ciplex, a digital marketing and creative agency, created the following infographic of 15 difficult-client types and how businesses can identify and successfully work with them.


Among the difficult types of clients…


  • Mr. I’m Not Really Sure What I Want. He constantly changes his mind from hour to hour. His indecision derails projects.
  • Mr. Everything’s an Emergency. He is the only client on the planet who should matter to you. Well, at least, he thinks he is.
  • Mrs. I Care So Much It Hurts. She knows exactly what she wants and demands everything done exactly to her specifications. Your input is not wanted.
  • Ms. I Hate That Color for No Reason. This client sweats the small stuff. She hyperfocuses on a tiny feature, color, font, or word to the point that all progress halts until the trivial matter is solved.
  • Mr./Mrs./Mrs./Mr. Decision-by-Committee. This client works together completely and will do nothing without a major meeting of minds. Every decision requires the entire committee.


Check out the infographic above to learn about those and other clients that occupy the business world.



See on marketingprofs.com

Tocquigny Staff posted by Tocquigny Staff

View comments

BACK TO THE TOP